Article published In:
Gesture
Vol. 21:2/3 (2022) ► pp.264295
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2024. A cross-cultural analysis of the gestural pattern of surprise and surprise-disapproval questions. Intercultural Pragmatics 21:3  pp. 307 ff. DOI logo

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