Article published In:
Review of Cognitive Linguistics
Vol. 22:1 (2024) ► pp.7099
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Galac, Ádám
2024. Bold colors, sweeping melodies, offensive smells. International Journal of Language and Culture 11:1  pp. 58 ff. DOI logo

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