Publications

Publication details [#11718]

Cutter, Martha J. 2005. Lost and found in translation: contemporary ethnic American writing and the politics of language diversity. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press. viii + 326 pp.
Publication type
Monograph
Publication language
English
Main ISBN
0-8078-2977-3
Edition info
Paperback ISBN: 0-8078-5637-1

Abstract

Starting with Salman Rushdie's assertion that even though something is always lost in translation, something can always be gained, Martha Cutter examines the trope of translation in twenty English-language novels and autobiographies by contemporary ethnic American writers. She argues that these works advocate a politics of language diversity--a literary and social agenda that validates the multiplicity of ethnic cultures and tongues in the United States. Cutter studies works by Asian American, Native American, African American, and Mexican American authors. She argues that translation between cultures, languages, and dialects creates a new language that, in its diversity, constitutes the true heritage of the United States. Through the metaphor of translation, Cutter demonstrates, writers such as Maxine Hong Kingston, Sherman Alexie, Toni Morrison, and Richard Rodriguez establish a place within American society for the many languages spoken by multiethnic and multicultural individuals. Cutter concludes with an analysis of contemporary debates over language policy, such as English-only legislation, the recognition of Ebonics, and the growing acceptance of bilingualism.
Based on publisher information