Part of
Romance Perspectives on Construction Grammar
Edited by Hans C. Boas and Francisco Gonzálvez-García
[Constructional Approaches to Language 15] 2014
► pp. 269304
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Lewandowski, Wojciech
2014. The locative alternation in verb-framed vs. satellite-framed languages. Studies in Language 38:4  pp. 864 ff. DOI logo
Pedersen, Johan
2016. Spanish constructions of directed motion – a quantitative study. In Corpus-based Approaches to Construction Grammar [Constructional Approaches to Language, 19],  pp. 105 ff. DOI logo
Pedersen, Johan
2019. Verb-based vs. schema-based constructions and their variability: On the Spanish transitive directed-motion construction in a contrastive perspective. Linguistics 57:3  pp. 473 ff. DOI logo
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2020. ¿Esto se echa para atrás? An approach to verb-particle constructions in European Spanish based on a corpus study of [V para atrás]. Romanica Olomucensia 32:1  pp. 201 ff. DOI logo
Wiesinger, Evelyn
2021. The Spanish verb-particle construction [V para atrás]. In Constructions in Contact 2 [Constructional Approaches to Language, 30],  pp. 140 ff. DOI logo

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