Part of
Morphology and Meaning: Selected papers from the 15th International Morphology Meeting, Vienna, February 2012
Edited by Franz Rainer, Francesco Gardani, Hans Christian Luschützky and Wolfgang U. Dressler
[Current Issues in Linguistic Theory 327] 2014
► pp. 289302
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Cited by

Cited by 6 other publications

Berman, Ruth A.
2016. Typology, acquisition, and development. In Acquisition and Development of Hebrew [Trends in Language Acquisition Research, 19],  pp. 1 ff. DOI logo
Berman, Ruth A.
2018. From Pre-Grammaticality to Proficiency in L1: Acquiring and Developing Infinitival Usage in Hebrew. Psychology of Language and Communication 22:1  pp. 557 ff. DOI logo
Bolozky, Shmuel & Ruth A. Berman
2020. Chapter 9. Parts of speech categories in the lexicon of Modern Hebrew. In Usage-Based Studies in Modern Hebrew [Studies in Language Companion Series, 210],  pp. 265 ff. DOI logo
Ravid, Dorit, O. Ashkenazi, Ronit Levie, G. Ben-Zadok, T. Grunwald & Steven Gillis
2016. Foundations of the early root category. In Acquisition and Development of Hebrew [Trends in Language Acquisition Research, 19],  pp. 95 ff. DOI logo
Rodrigue-Schwarzwald, Ora
2022. Tracking a Morphological Pattern: miCCaC in Hebrew. In Developing Language and Literacy [Literacy Studies, 23],  pp. 685 ff. DOI logo
Schwarzwald, Ora R.
2020. Chapter 7. Inflection. In Usage-Based Studies in Modern Hebrew [Studies in Language Companion Series, 210],  pp. 147 ff. DOI logo

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