Article published In:
English World-Wide
Vol. 35:3 (2014) ► pp.306337
References
Babbie, Earl, and Johann Mouton
2001The Practice of Social Research. Cape Town: Oxford University Press Southern Africa.Google Scholar
Bangeni, Bongi, and Rochelle Kapp
2007 “Shifting Language Attitudes in a Linguistically Diverse Learning Environment in South Africa”. Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development 281: 253–269. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
Bekker, Ian
2009“The Vowels of South African English”. PhD dissertation, North-West University, South Africa.
Bekker, Ian, and Gina Eley
2007“An Acoustic Analysis of White South African English (WSAfE) Monophthongs”. Southern African Linguistics and Applied Language Studies 251: 107–114. DOI logo>Google Scholar
Boersma, Paul, and David Weenink
2011 “Praat: Doing Phonetics by Computer” (Version 5.1.05). [URL] (accessed February 1, 2011)
Bradac, James
1990“Language Attitudes and Impression Formation”. In Peter Robinson, and Howard Giles, eds. Handbook of Language and Social Psychology. New York: John Wiley and Sons, 387–412.>Google Scholar
Buthelezi, Qedusizi
1995“South African Black English: Lexical and Syntactic Characteristics”. In Rajend Mesthrie, ed. Language and Social History: Studies in South African Sociolinguistics. Cape Town: David Philip Publishers, 242–250.Google Scholar
Butler, Christopher
1985Statistics in Linguistics. Oxford: Blackwell.Google Scholar
Cohen, Lewis, Lawrence Manion, and Keith Morrison
eds 2011. Research Methods in Education (7th ed.). London and New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
Da Silva, Arista
2008“South African English: A Sociolinguistic Investigation of an Emerging Variety”. PhD dissertation, University of Witwatersrand, South Africa.
De Klerk, Vivian
1999“Black South African English: Where To From Here?”. World Englishes 181: 311–324. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
2000a“Language Shift in Grahamstown: A Case Study of Selected Xhosa Speakers”. International Journal of the Sociology of Language 1461: 87–110. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
2000b“To Be Xhosa or Not to Be Xhosa... That Is the Question”. Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development 211: 198–215. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
Di Paolo, Marianna, Malcah Yaeger-Dror, and Alicia Beckford Wassink
2011. “Analyzing Vowels”. In Marianna Di Paolo, and Malcah Yaeger-Dror, eds. Sociophonetics: A Student’s Guide. London and New York: Routledge, 223–281.Google Scholar
Edwards, John
2009Language and Identity: An Introduction. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
Fasold, Ralph
1984The Sociolinguistics of Society: An Introduction to Sociolinguistics Volume 1. Oxford: Blackwell.Google Scholar
Fiske, Edward, and Helen Ladd
2004aElusive Equity: Education Reform in Post-Apartheid South Africa. Washington, D. C.: Brookings Institution Press.Google Scholar
2004b“Balancing Public and Private Resources for Basic Education: School Fees in Post-Apartheid South Africa”. In Linda Chisholm, ed. Changing Class: Educational and Social Change in Post-Apartheid South Africa.Cape Town: HSRC Press, 57–88.Google Scholar
Gaganakis, Margaret
1992“Language and Ethnic Group Relations in Non-Racial Schools”. English Academy Review: Southern African Journal of English Studies 91: 46–55. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
Giles, Howard
1973“Accent Mobility: A Model and Some Data”. Anthropological Linguistics 151: 87–105.Google Scholar
Hofmeyr, Jane, and Simon Lee
2004“The New Face of Private Schooling”. In Linda Chisholm, ed. Changing Class: Educational and Social Change in Post-Apartheid South Africa. Cape Town: HSRC Press, 143–174.Google Scholar
Kamwangamalu, Nkonko
2002“The Social History of English in South Africa”. World Englishes 211: 1–8. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
Kaschula, Russell, and Christine Anthonissen
1995Communicating Across Culture in South Africa: Toward a Critical Language Awareness. Johannesburg: Hodder and Stoughton.Google Scholar
Labov, William
1972Sociolinguistic Patterns. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.Google Scholar
Ladefoged, Peter
2006A Course in Phonetics (5th ed.). Boston: Thomson Wadsworth.Google Scholar
Lanham, Leonhard, and Callum Macdonald
Lass, Roger
1995“South African English”. In Rajend Mesthrie, ed. Language and Social History: Studies in South African Sociolinguistics. Cape Town: David Phillip, 89–106.Google Scholar
Makoe, Pinky
2007“Language, Discourses and Identity Construction in a Multilingual South African Primary School”. English Academy Review: Southern African Journal of English Studies 241: 55–71. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
Makubalo, George
2007“‘I Don’t Know... It Contradicts’: Identity Construction and the Use of English by High School Learners in a Desegregated Space”. English Academy Review: Southern African Journal of English Studies 241: 25–41. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
McKinney, Carolyn
2009“‘If I Speak English, Does It Make Me Less Black Anyway?’: ‘Race’ and English in South African Desegregated Schools”. English Academy Review: Southern African Journal of English Studies 241: 6–24. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
McLaughlin, Eric
2006“Language, Democracy and Governance in South Africa”. In Victor Webb, and Theo Du Plessis, eds. The Politics of Language in South Africa. Pretoria: Van Schaik, 118–137.Google Scholar
Mesthrie, Rajend
2006“Language, Transformation and Development: A Sociolinguistic Appraisal of Post-Apartheid South Africa Language Policy and Practice”. Southern African Linguistics and Applied Language Studies 241: 151–163. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
2010“Socio-Phonetics and Social Change: Deracialisation of the GOOSE Vowel in South African English”. Journal of Sociolinguistics 141: 3–33. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
2012“English in Africa: A Diachronic Typology”. In Alexander Berg, and Laurel Brinton, eds. Handbücher zur Sprach-und Kommunikationswissenschaft/ Handbooks of Linguistics and Communication Science (English Historical Linguistics, Volume 2). Berlin and New York: Mouton de Gruyter, 2092–2106.Google Scholar
Milroy, Lesley
2002“Social Networks”. In Jack Chambers, Peter Trudgill, and Natalie Schilling-Estes, eds. The Handbook of Language Variation and Change. Oxford: Blackwell, 549–572.Google Scholar
Myers-Scotton, Carol
2002Contact Linguistics: Bilingual Encounters and Grammatical Outcomes. Oxford: Oxford University Press. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
Ndlangamandla, Sibusiso
2010“(Unofficial) Multilingualism in Desegregated Schools: Learners’ Use Of and View Towards African Languages”. Southern African Linguistics and Applied Language Studies 281: 61–73. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
Nongogo, Nomakhalipha
2007“‘Mina ’ngumZulu phaqa’: Language and Identity Among Multilingual Grade 9 Learners at a Private Desegregated High School in South Africa”. English Academy Review: Southern African Journal of English Studies 241: 42–54. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
Peirce, Bonny
1995“Social Identity, Investment, and Language Learning”. TESOL Quarterly 291: 9–31. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
Provincial Profile
2004: Eastern Cape / Statistics South Africa. Pretoria: Statistics South Africa, 2006. Report No. 00-91-02(2004). [URL] (accessed February 4, 2011).
Reagan, Timothy
2009Language Matters: Reflections on Educational Linguistics. Charlotte, NC: Information Age.Google Scholar
Riches, Phoebe, and Margaret Foddy
1989“Ethnic Accent as a Status Cue”. Social Psychology Quarterly 521: 197–206. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
Rudwick, Stephanie
2008“‘Coconuts’ and ‘Oreos’: English-Speaking Zulu People in a South African Township”. World Englishes 271: 101–116. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
Soudien, Crain
2004“‘Constituting the Class’: An Analysis of the Process of ‘Integration’ in South African Schools”. In Linda Chisholm, ed. Changing Class: Educational and Social Change in Post-Apartheid South Africa. Cape Town: HSRC Press, 89–114.Google Scholar
Thomas, Erik, and Tyler Kendall
2007 “NORM: The Vowel Normalization and Plotting Suite”. [URL] (accessed March 6, 2011).
Van Rooy, Bertus
2004“Black South African English”. In Bernd Kortmann, Edgar Schneider, Kate Burridge, Rajend Mesthrie, and Clive Upton, eds. A Handbook of Varieties of English. Volume 1: Phonology. Berlin and New York: Mouton de Gruyter, 943–952.Google Scholar
Watt, Dominic, and Anne Fabricius
2002“Evaluation of a Technique for Improving the Mapping of Multiple Speakers’ Vowel Spaces in the F1˜F2 Plane”. In Diane Nelson, ed. Leeds Working Papers in Linguistics and Phonetics 9, 159–173. [URL] (accessed December 5, 2010).Google Scholar
Watt, Dominic, Anne Fabricius, and Tyler Kendall
2011“More on Vowels”. In Marianna Di Paolo, and Malcah Yaeger-Dror, eds. Sociophonetics: A Student’s Guide. London and New York: Routledge, 282–316.Google Scholar
Wilmot, Kirstin
2011 “Socio-Cultural Change in Two Prestigious Secondary Schools in South Africa: A Sociophonetic Study of Black and White Females”. MA dissertation, University of Cape Town, South Africa.
Cited by

Cited by 11 other publications

Bekker, Ian
2019. South African English, the Dynamic Model and the Challenge of Afrikaans Influence. In English in Multilingual South Africa,  pp. 30 ff. DOI logo
Botha, Werner, Bertus van Rooy & Susan Coetzee‐van Rooy
2021. South African Englishes: A contemporary bibliography. World Englishes 40:1  pp. 136 ff. DOI logo
Kotze, Haidee
2019. Does Editing Matter? Editorial Work, Endonormativity and Convergence in Written Englishes in South Africa. In English in Multilingual South Africa,  pp. 101 ff. DOI logo
Mesthrie, Rajend
2015. English in India and South Africa: Comparisons, Commonalities and Contrasts. African Studies 74:2  pp. 186 ff. DOI logo
Mesthrie, Rajend, Alida Chevalier & Timothy Dunne
2015. A Regional and Social Dialectology of the BATH Vowel in South African English. Language Variation and Change 27:1  pp. 1 ff. DOI logo
Mesthrie, Rajend, Alida Chevalier & Kate McLachlan
2015. A perception test for the deracialisation of middle class South African English. Southern African Linguistics and Applied Language Studies 33:4  pp. 391 ff. DOI logo
Toefy, Tracey
2017. Revisiting the kit-split in Coloured South African English. English World-Wide. A Journal of Varieties of English 38:3  pp. 336 ff. DOI logo
Verhoeven, Monique, Astrid M. G. Poorthuis & Monique Volman
2019. The Role of School in Adolescents’ Identity Development. A Literature Review. Educational Psychology Review 31:1  pp. 35 ff. DOI logo
Álvarez-Mosquera, Pedro
2017. The Use of the Implicit Association Test (IAT) for Sociolinguistic Purposes in South Africa. Language Matters 48:2  pp. 69 ff. DOI logo
Álvarez-Mosquera, Pedro
2019. Young Coloureds’ implicit attitudes towards two historically White English accents in the South African context. English World-Wide. A Journal of Varieties of English 40:3  pp. 325 ff. DOI logo
Álvarez-Mosquera, Pedro & Alejandro Marín-Gutiérrez
2019. A sociolinguistic approach to implicit language attitudes towards historically white English accents among young L1 South African indigenous language speakers. International Journal of the Sociology of Language 2019:260  pp. 131 ff. DOI logo

This list is based on CrossRef data as of 30 may 2024. Please note that it may not be complete. Sources presented here have been supplied by the respective publishers. Any errors therein should be reported to them.