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Cienki, Alan
2022. Epilogue. Creative to whom, and on what basis?. In Time Representations in the Perspective of Human Creativity [Human Cognitive Processing, 75],  pp. 233 ff. DOI logo
Cienki, Alan
2022. The study of gesture in cognitive linguistics: How it could inform and inspire other research in cognitive science. WIREs Cognitive Science 13:6 DOI logo
Cienki, Alan & Michael O’Connor
Gibbs, Raymond W.
2021. Metaphors in the flesh: Metaphorical pantomimes in sports celebrations. Cognitive Linguistics 32:1  pp. 67 ff. DOI logo

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