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Cited by

Cited by 2 other publications

Barnden, John A.
2022. Metonymy, reflexive hyperbole and broadly reflexive relationships. Review of Cognitive Linguistics 20:1  pp. 33 ff. DOI logo
Szymańska, Monika
2021. Grammatical metonymy and construal operations. Review of Cognitive Linguistics 19:2  pp. 465 ff. DOI logo

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