Article published In:
Linguistic Approaches to Bilingualism
Vol. 5:2 (2015) ► pp.252284
References
Behrens, H
(2006) The input-output relationship in first language acquisition. Language and Cognitive Processes, 21(1-3), 2–24. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
Biggs, A
(2013 30th August). Microparametric variation in A-movement in Northwest British English. [Annual Meeting of the Linguistics Association of Great Britain]. School of Oriental and African Studies.Google Scholar
Bowerman, M
(1985) Beyond communicative adequacy: From piecemeal knowledge to an integrated system in the child’s acquisition of language. In K. Nelson (Ed.), Children’s language (pp. 369–398). Hillsdale, NJ.: Lawrence Erlbaum.Google Scholar
Bresnan, J., & Nikitina, T
(2003) On the gradience of the dative alternation. Online manuscript, retrieved February 3, 2014, from [URL].
Bruening, B
(2010) Double object constructions disguised as prepositional datives. Linguistic Inquiry, 41(2), 287–305. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
Bruyn, A., Muysken, P., & Verrips, M
(1999) Double-object constructions in the creole languages: Development and acquisition. In M. DeGraff (Ed.), Language creation and language change: Creolization, diachrony, and development (pp. 329–373). Cambridge, MA.: MIT Press.Google Scholar
Callies, M., & Szczesniak, K
(2008) Argument realisation, information status and syntactic weight – a learner-corpus study of the dative alternation. Online manuscript, retrieved April 30, 2012, from [URL].
Cook, V.J
(1976) A note on indirect objects. Journal of Child Language, 3(3), 435–437. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
Drenhaus, H
(2004) Minimalism, features and parallel grammars: on the acquisition of German ditransitive structures. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of Potsdam.
Drenhaus, H., & Féry, C
(2008) Animacy and child grammar: An OT account. Lingua, 118(2), 222–244. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
Eisenbeiss, S., Bartke, S., & Clahsen, H
(2006) Structural and lexical case in child German: Evidence from language-impaired and typically developing children. Language Acquisition, 13(1), 3–32. DOI: DOI logoGoogle Scholar
Gathercole, V.C.M
(2002a) Command of the mass/count distinction in bilingual and monolingual children: An English morphosyntactic distinction. In D.K. Oller, & R.E. Eilers (Eds.), Language and literacy in bilingual children (pp. 175–206). Clevedon: Multilingual Matters. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
(2002b) Grammatical gender in bilingual and monolingual children: A Spanish morphosyntactic distinction. In D.K. Oller, & R.E. Eilers (Eds.), Language and literacy in bilingual children (pp. 207–219). Clevedon: Multilingual Matters. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
Genesee, F., Paradis, J., & Crago, M
(2004) Dual language development and disorders: A handbook on bilingualism and second language learning. Baltimore, MD.: Brookes.Google Scholar
Gropen, J., Pinker, S., Hollander, M., Goldberg, R., & Wilson, R
(1989) The learnability and acquisition of the dative alternation in English. Language, 65(2), 203–257. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
Grosjean, F
(2008) Studying bilinguals. Oxford, New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Haddican, W
(2010) Theme-goal ditransitives and theme passivisation in British English dialects. Lingua, 120(10), 2424–2443. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
Hulk, A., & Müller, N
(2000) Bilingual first language acquisition at the interface between syntax and pragmatics. Bilingualism: Language and Cognition, 31, 227–244. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
Jackendoff, R
(2002) Foundations of language: Brain, meaning, grammar, evolution. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
König, E., & Gast, V
(2007) Understanding English-German contrasts, 2nd ed. Berlin: Erich Schmidt Verlag.Google Scholar
Krifka, M
(2004) Semantic and pragmatic conditions for the dative alternation. Korean Journal of English Language and Linguistics, 41, 1–32.Google Scholar
Kupisch, T
(2012) Specific and generic subjects in the Italian of German-Italian simultaneous bilinguals and L2 learners. Bilingualism: Language and Cognition, 15(4), 726–756. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
Kupisch, T., Akpinar, D., & Stöhr, A
(2013) Gender assignment and gender agreement in adult bilinguals and second language learners of French. Linguistic Approaches to Bilingualism, 3(2), 150–179. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
Lardiere, D
(2011) Who is the Interface Hypothesis about? Linguistic Approaches to Bilingualism, 1(1), 48–53. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
Larson, R.K
(1988) On the double object construction. Linguistic Inquiry, 19(3), 335–361.Google Scholar
Levin, B
(1993) English verb classes and alternations: a preliminary investigation. Chicago, IL.: The University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
Liamkina, O
(2008) Making dative a case for semantic analysis: differences in use between native and non-native speakers of German. In A. Tyler, M. Takada, & Y. Kim (Eds.), Language in the context of use: Discourse and cognitive approaches to language (pp. 145–166). Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter.Google Scholar
MacWhinney, B
(2000) The CHILDES Project: Tools for analysing talk, 3rd ed. Mahwah, NJ.: Erlbaum.Google Scholar
Meisel, J.M
(1989) Early differentiation of languages in bilingual children. In K. Hyltenstam, & L.K. Obler (Eds.), Bilingualism across the lifespan: Aspects of acquisition, maturity and loss (pp. 13–40). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
Mills, A.E
(1985) The acquisition of German. In D.I. Slobin (Ed.), The crosslinguistic study of language acquisition. Volume 1: The data (pp. 141–254). Hillsdale, NJ.: Erlbaum.Google Scholar
Montrul, S
(2004) Subject and object expression in Spanish heritage speakers. A case of morphosyntactic convergence. Bilingualism: Language and Cognition, 7(2), 125–142. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
(2006) On the bilingual competence of Spanish heritage speakers. Syntax, lexical-semantics and processing. International Journal of Bilingualism, 10(1), 37–69. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
Montrul, S.A
Montrul, S., & Ionin, T
(2010) Transfer effects in the interpretation of definite articles by Spanish heritage speakers. Bilingualism: Language and Cognition, 13(4), 440–473. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
Müller, N., & Hulk, A
(2001) Crosslinguistic influence in bilingual language acquisition: Italian and French as recipient languages. Bilingualism: Language and Cognition, 4(1), 1–21. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
Paradis, J
(2011) The impact of input on bilingual language development: quantity versus quality. Linguistic Approaches to Bilingualism, 1(1), 67–70. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
Pérez-Leroux, A.T., Pirvulescu, M., & Roberge, Y
(2009) Bilingualism as a window into the language faculty: The acquisition of objects in French-speaking children in bilingual and monolingual contexts. Bilingualism: Language and Cognition, 12(1), 97–112. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
Pinker, S
(1989) Learnability and cognition: The acquisition of argument structure. Cambridge, MA.: MIT Press.Google Scholar
Pires, A., & Rothman, J
(2011) An integrated perspective on comparative bilingual differences: Beyond the interface problem? Linguistic Approaches to Bilingualism, 1(1), 74–78. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
Pylkkänen, L
(2008) Introducing arguments. Cambridge, MA.: MIT Press. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
Rappaport Hovav, M., & Levin, B
(2008) The English dative alternation: The case for verb sensitivity. Journal of Linguistics, 44(1), 129–167. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
Rothman, J
(2009) Understanding the nature and outcomes of early bilingualism: Romance languages as heritage languages. International Journal of Bilingualism, 13(2), 155–163. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
Schmitz, K
(2006) Indirect objects and dative case in monolingual German and bilingual German-Romance language acquisition. In D. Hole, A. Meinunger, & W. Abraham (Eds.), Datives and other cases: Between argument structure and event structure (pp. 239–268). Amsterdam: John Benjamins. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
Schönenberger, M., Sterner, F., & Ruberg, T
(2011) The realization of indirect objects and dative case in German. In J. Herschensohn, & D. Tanner (Eds.), Proceedings of the 11th Generative Approaches to Second Language Acquisition Conference (GASLA 2011) (pp. 143–151). Somerville, MA.: Cascadilla Proceedings Project.Google Scholar
Schönenberger, M., Rothweiler, M., & Sterner, F
(2012) Case marking in child L1 and early child L2 German. In K. Braunmüller, & C. Gabriel (Eds.), Multilingual individuals and multilingual societies (pp. 3–22). Amsterdam: John Benjamins. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
Siewierska, A
(1998) Languages with and without objects: The Functional Grammar approach. Languages in Contrast, 11, 173–190. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
Silva-Corvalán, C
(2014) Bilingual language acquisition: Spanish and English in the first six years. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
Snyder, W., & Stromswold, K
(1997) The structure and acquisition of English dative constructions. Linguistic Inquiry, 28(2), 281–317.Google Scholar
Sorace, A., & Filiaci, F
(2006) Anaphora resolution in near-native speakers of Italian. Second Language Research, 22(3), 339–368. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
Sorace, A., & Serratrice, L
(2009) Internal and external interfaces in bilingual language development: Beyond structural overlap. International Journal of Bilingualism, 13(2), 195–210. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
Sorace, A
(2011) Pinning down the concept of “interface” in bilingualism. Linguistic Approaches to Bilingualism, 1(1), 1–33. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
Stöhr, A., Akpinar, D., Bianchi, G., & Kupisch, T
(2012) Gender marking in Italian-German heritage speakers and L2 learners of German. In K. Braunmüller, & C. Gabriel (Eds.), Multilingual individuals and multilingual societies (MIMS) (pp. 153–170). Amsterdam: John Benjamins. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
Thornton, R
(1998) Elicited production. In D. McDaniel, C. McKee, & H.S. Cairns (Eds.), Methods for assessing children’s syntax (pp. 77–102). Cambridge, MA.: MIT Press.Google Scholar
Tsimpli, I., & Sorace, A
(2006) Differentiating interfaces: L2 performance in syntax–semantics and syntax-discourse phenomena. Proceedings of the 30th annual Boston university conference in language development, 653–664.Google Scholar
Van der Linden, E
(2000) Non-selective access and activation in child bilingualism: The lexicon. In S. Döpke (Ed.), Cross-linguistic structures in simultaneous bilingualism (pp. 37–56). Amsterdam: John Benjamins. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
von Stutterheim, C
(2004) CHILDES German corpus: Caroline. Retrieved August 13, 2012, from [URL]
Weissenborn, J., Kail, M., & Friederici, A
(1990) Language-particular or language-independent factors in acquisition? Children’s comprehension of object pronouns in Dutch, French and German. First Language, 101, 141–166. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
Yip, V
(2013) Simultaneous language acquisition. In F. Grosjean, & P. Li (Eds.), The psycholinguistics of bilingualism (pp. 119–144). Malden, MA.: Wiley-Blackwell.Google Scholar
Yip, V., & Matthews, S
(2007) The bilingual child: Early development and language contact. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
Zarqane, S
(2009) Dative constructions in English-French bilingual and monolingual acquisition. Unpublished MA dissertation, University of Sheffield.Google Scholar
Cited by

Cited by 4 other publications

Kholodova, Alina, Michelle Peter, Caroline F. Rowland, Gunnar Jacob & Shanley E. M. Allen
2023. Abstract Priming and the Lexical Boost Effect across Development in a Structurally Biased Language. Languages 8:4  pp. 264 ff. DOI logo
Kupisch, Tanja
2021. Heritage Languages in Europe. In The Cambridge Handbook of Heritage Languages and Linguistics,  pp. 45 ff. DOI logo
Yang, Charles & Silvina Montrul
2017. Learning datives: The Tolerance Principle in monolingual and bilingual acquisition. Second Language Research 33:1  pp. 119 ff. DOI logo
[no author supplied]
2021. Heritage Languages around the World. In The Cambridge Handbook of Heritage Languages and Linguistics,  pp. 11 ff. DOI logo

This list is based on CrossRef data as of 3 april 2024. Please note that it may not be complete. Sources presented here have been supplied by the respective publishers. Any errors therein should be reported to them.