Part of
Pragmatic Markers in Irish English
Edited by Carolina P. Amador-Moreno, Kevin McCafferty and Elaine Vaughan
[Pragmatics & Beyond New Series 258] 2015
► pp. 390407
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Cited by 10 other publications

Corrigan, Karen P. & Chloé Diskin
2020. ‘Northmen, Southmen, comrades all’? The adoption of discourselikeby migrants north and south of the Irish border. Language in Society 49:5  pp. 745 ff. DOI logo
Diskin-Holdaway, Chloé
2023. Acquisition of Irish English by Recent Migrants. In The Oxford Handbook of Irish English,  pp. 610 ff. DOI logo
Magliacane, Annarita
2020. Erasmus students in an Irish studyabroad context. Study Abroad Research in Second Language Acquisition and International Education 5:1  pp. 89 ff. DOI logo
Ní Mhurchú, Aoife
2018. What’s Left to Say About Irish English Progressives? “I’m Not Going Having Any Conversation with You”. Corpus Pragmatics 2:3  pp. 289 ff. DOI logo
O’Keeffe, Anne
2023. Irish English Corpus Linguistics. In The Oxford Handbook of Irish English,  pp. 243 ff. DOI logo
P. Amador-Moreno, Carolina
2023. Discourse-Pragmatic Markers in Irish English. In The Oxford Handbook of Irish English,  pp. 426 ff. DOI logo
Schulte, Marion
2022. The Silences and Silencing of First Languages Among L2 Speakers of English in Ireland. In Silence and its Derivatives,  pp. 311 ff. DOI logo
Schulte, Marion
2023. Dublin English and Third-Wave Sociolinguistics. In The Oxford Handbook of Irish English,  pp. 339 ff. DOI logo
Schweinberger, Martin
2020. Speech-unit final like in Irish English. English World-Wide. A Journal of Varieties of English 41:1  pp. 89 ff. DOI logo

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