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Cited by

Cited by 1 other publications

Calvo Cortés, Nuria
2024. Filled-in petition forms and hand-drafted petitions to the Foundling Hospital. In Unlocking the History of English [Current Issues in Linguistic Theory, 364],  pp. 198 ff. DOI logo

This list is based on CrossRef data as of 24 may 2024. Please note that it may not be complete. Sources presented here have been supplied by the respective publishers. Any errors therein should be reported to them.