Tom Güldemann

List of John Benjamins publications for which Tom Güldemann plays a role.

Journal

Titles

Beyond ‘Khoisan’: Historical relations in the Kalahari Basin

Edited by Tom Güldemann and Anne-Maria Fehn

[Current Issues in Linguistic Theory, 330] 2014. xii, 331 pp.
Subjects Historical linguistics | Other African languages | Theoretical linguistics

Reported Discourse: A meeting ground for different linguistic domains

Edited by Tom Güldemann and Manfred von Roncador

[Typological Studies in Language, 52] 2002. xii, 425 pp.
Subjects Discourse studies | Pragmatics | Typology

Articles

Based on data from a range of geographically and genealogically diverse African languages this article describes a little recognized strategy for expressing focus. It is based on marking all material of an utterance as background except for the single focus constituent. This kind of “maximal… read more | Article
This paper combines regional anthropological comparison, historical linguistics and phylogenetic comparative methodology (PCM) concerning the analysis of sibling terminology in order to address the historical relationships between the languages of the three South African Khoisan families, Kx’a, Tuu… read more | Article
Güldemann, Tom 2014 The Lower Nossob varieties of Tuu: !Ui, Taa or neither?Beyond ‘Khoisan’: Historical relations in the Kalahari Basin, Güldemann, Tom and Anne-Maria Fehn (eds.), pp. 257–282
North of the confluence of the Nossob, Auob, and Molopo Rivers in the Kalahari, several speech varieties of San groups have been attested, if only poorly, by linguistic data, notably ǀ’Auni and (Ku)ǀHaasi. Their relationship to the Tuu family (earlier referred to as ‘Southern Khoisan’) and their… read more | Article
Güldemann, Tom 2014 ‘Khoisan’ linguistic classification todayBeyond ‘Khoisan’: Historical relations in the Kalahari Basin, Güldemann, Tom and Anne-Maria Fehn (eds.), pp. 1–40
Proposed by Greenberg (1950, 1963) as a language family, the currently available evidence indicates that ‘Khoisan’ in a linguistic sense can be viewed, at best, as a negative entity. It comprises a diverse range of languages in southern and eastern Africa which share the typological feature of… read more | Article
Güldemann, Tom 2012 Thetic speaker-instantiating quotative indexes as a cross-linguistic typeQuotatives: Cross-linguistic and cross-disciplinary perspectives, Buchstaller, Isabelle and Ingrid van Alphen (eds.), pp. 117–142
Quotative indexes often do not simply encode a speech event but turn out to be grammatical constructions with the dual function of referring to a state of affairs and of orienting the audience to the presence of reported discourse. A still poorly-analyzed quotative strategy without overt reference… read more | Article
Article
The paper presents first results of the documentation of Tuu languages regarding information structure, based on the analysis of coherent texts, partly supplemented by elicitated utterances. Unmarked clauses display a fairly strict verb-medial structure; the clause-initial subject can be… read more | Article
Article
Kwadi is a virtually unknown and probably extinct click language of southwestern Angola. It has thus far not been assigned conclusively to any genealogical language group in Africa. Apart from being subsumed under the non-genealogical label ‘Khoisan’, the only concrete hypothesis has been to… read more | Article
Predication focus — a category where the predicate or a part thereof constitutes (or is part of) the sentence focus — is frequently encoded across the Bantu family by inflectional or morphosyntactic means. This phenomenon is associated with another observation which is rather unexpected at first… read more | Article
Chapter
Güldemann, Tom and Manfred von Roncador 2002 PrefaceReported Discourse: A meeting ground for different linguistic domains, Güldemann, Tom and Manfred von Roncador (eds.), pp. vii ff.
Miscellaneous
Güldemann, Tom, Manfred von Roncador and Wim van der Wurff 2002 16. A comprehensive bibliography of reported discourseReported Discourse: A meeting ground for different linguistic domains, Güldemann, Tom and Manfred von Roncador (eds.), pp. 363–415
Chapter