Article published In:
Pragmatics and Society
Vol. 9:4 (2018) ► pp.571597
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Gruber, Helmut
2019. Staged conflicts in Austrian parliamentary debates. Language and Dialogue 9:1  pp. 42 ff. DOI logo
Gruber, Helmut
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Gruber, Helmut
2022. “Secret Service Plot” or “Drunken Night”? Accounting Strategies in a Resignation Speech and Their Uptake in Media Reports in Three Countries. Contrastive Pragmatics 3:3  pp. 397 ff. DOI logo

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