Part of
Romeo and Juliet in European Culture
Edited by Juan F. Cerdá, Dirk Delabastita and Keith Gregor
[Shakespeare in European Culture 1] 2017
► pp. 119138
References

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Cited by

Cited by 1 other publications

Ruiz Morgan, Jennifer de la Salud
2022. Chapter 13. A selective timeline of Othello in European culture. In Othelloin European Culture [Shakespeare in European Culture, 3],  pp. 247 ff. DOI logo

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