A Sociophonetic Approach to Scottish Standard English

| University of Bamberg
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Applying a sociophonetic research paradigm, this volume presents an investigation of variation and change in the Scottish Standard English accent. Based on original audio recordings made in Edinburgh, it provides detailed acoustic and auditory analyses of selected accent features. In contrast to other studies of English in Scotland, the focus is on the extent to which certain characteristics of middle-class speech are susceptible (or immune) to the influence of Southern Standard British English, or vary in ways unrelated to that influence. Beyond the fine-grained patterns of variation that are revealed, the study highlights innovative methodological approaches to sociophonetic variation and contributes to a better general understanding of the status and function of Scottish Standard English. The book will be of general interest to sociolinguists and sociophoneticians, and of particular interest to researchers or students concerned with phonetic or phonological aspects of Scottish English.
[Varieties of English Around the World, G53]  2015.  xx, 179 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
List of tables
ix
List of figures
xi–xii
List of equations
xiii
List of abbreviations
xv–xvi
List of other symbols
xvii
Acknowledgements
xix–xx
1. Introduction
1–15
2. Scottish Standard English in context
17–31
3. Explaining accent variation and change
33–46
4. Data and methodology
47–65
5. The research context for (e) and (o)
67–78
6. Statistical analyses of (e) and (o)
79–99
7. The research context for (r)
101–114
8. Statistical analyses of (r)
115–138
9. Conclusion: Variation and change in SSE
139–147
References
149–162
Appendices
163–175
Index
177–179
Cited by

Cited by 3 other publications

No author info given
2016. PUBLICATIONS RECEIVED. English Language and Linguistics 20:1  pp. 183 ff. Crossref logo
Dickson, Victoria & Lauren Hall-Lew
2017. Class, Gender, and Rhoticity: The Social Stratification of Non-Prevocalic /r/ in Edinburgh Speech. Journal of English Linguistics 45:3  pp. 229 ff. Crossref logo
Foulkes, Paul
2020.  In The Handbook of English Linguistics,  pp. 407 ff. Crossref logo

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Subjects
BIC Subject: CFB – Sociolinguistics
BISAC Subject: LAN009000 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Linguistics / General
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2015008369 | Marc record