Studies in Language

General Editors
ORCID logoKatharina Haude | CNRS-SEDYL
ORCID logoNicole Kruspe | Lund University
Associate Editors
I Wayan Arka | The Australian National University
ORCID logoPeter M. Arkadiev | Russian Academy of Sciences
Eleanor Coghill | Uppsala University
ORCID logoDenis Creissels | Lumière University Lyon 2
Jeff Good | University of Buffalo
Tom Güldemann | Humboldt University Berlin
ORCID logoMartin Haspelmath | Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History
Daniel Hole | University of Stuttgart
ORCID logoShoichi Iwasaki | University of California, Los Angeles
Sun-Ah Jun | University of California, Los Angeles
ORCID logoMarianne Mithun | University of California, Santa Barbara
ORCID logoDoris L. Payne | University of Oregon

Studies in Language (SL) provides a forum for the discussion of issues in contemporary linguistics, with a particular focus on empirically well-grounded research in the functionalist tradition that recognizes the diversity and variability of human languages and of communication patterns, the historical dynamics of languages, and the embedding of language in both social practices and cognition.

Studies in Language provides for three sections and types of contributions:

  • Regular articles: Regular articles are expected to adopt a cross-linguistic or comparative perspective and to advance our understanding of human language as such, in terms of state-of-the-art theories, methods, and analytical models or frameworks. Regular articles on one individual language are published only to the extent that they make a contribution of general interest.
  • News from the Field: SL welcomes short contributions that report on new discoveries in little-known or endangered languages, emphasizing description over theory and comparison. Contributions to this special section typically derive from original fieldwork and are expected to provide concise and well-substantiated analyses of linguistic phenomena that have not been noticed so far and for which the wider theoretical implications have yet to be established.
  • Review articles: Studies in Language invites proposals for Review Articles in which recent book publications relating to and relevant for some specific area of linguistic research are critically discussed. Review Articles must be preceded by a proposal, which will be evaluated by the journal editors. If the proposal is accepted, the Review Article author will receive a physical or digital copy of the book. The Review Article should be a well thought through and balanced survey. Specific areas of interest include morphology, syntax, semantics, pragmatics, historical linguistics, and discourse, with priority to a typological and cross-linguistic perspective. Review Articles of books on a single language are welcome if the topic is of interest to general linguists, whereas Review Articles of interdisciplinary studies are welcome to the extent that they have a strong functional linguistic orientation.

SL publishes its articles Online First.

Studies in Language now offers online submission.

ISSN: 0378-4177 | E-ISSN: 1569-9978
DOI logo
https://doi.org/10.1075/sl
Latest articles

8 April 2024

  • The links between evidentiality, modality, and grammaticalization : Position paper
    Eric Mélac | SL 48:3 (2024) pp. 513–542
  • 14 March 2024

  • The action reference construction in Mandarin Chinese and typology of lexical flexibility
    Liwei Gong Satoshi Uehara
  • 30 January 2024

  • Sequentiality : A novel use of the perfect in Gã
    Akua Campbell
  • 29 January 2024

  • Frequency differences in reportative exceptionality and how to account for them : A case study on verbal reportative markers in French, Dutch and German
    Tanja Mortelmans | SL 48:3 (2024) pp. 682–722
  • Evidentiality as a grammaticalization passenger : An investigation of evidential developments in Tibetic languages and beyond
    Eric Mélac Joanna Bialek | SL 48:3 (2024) pp. 638–681
  • 3 January 2024

  • ‘Until’ constructions and expletive negation in Huasteca Nahuatl
    Jesus Olguin Martinez
  • 8 December 2023

  • On the link between grammaticalization and subjectification : The case of the Dutch modals
    Jan Nuyts | SL 48:3 (2024) pp. 608–637
  • 28 November 2023

  • The paradigmaticity of evidentials in the Tibetic languages of Khams
    Dawa Drolma Hiroyuki Suzuki | SL 48:3 (2024) pp. 723–752
  • 21 November 2023

  • Evidentiality, discourse prominence and grammaticalization
    Kasper Boye | SL 48:3 (2024) pp. 575–607
  • 17 November 2023

  • Speaking about knowledge : Evidentiality and the ecology of language
    Alexandra Y. Aikhenvald | SL 48:3 (2024) pp. 543–574
  • 7 November 2023

  • A new converb originating from the locative noun in Beserman
    Maria Usacheva Natalia Serdobolskaya | SL 48:2 (2024) pp. 472–512
  • 31 October 2023

  • Adjectival intensification in West Germanic : A corpus-based comparison of Afrikaans, Dutch, English and German
    Daniel Van Olmen | SL 48:2 (2024) pp. 436–471
  • 3 October 2023

  • A binary inflectional voice contrast in Mabaan (Western Nilotic)
    Torben Andersen | SL 48:2 (2024) pp. 390–435
  • 1 September 2023

  • Comparing zero and referential choice in eight languages with a focus on Mandarin Chinese
    Maria Vollmer | SL 48:2 (2024) pp. 351–389
  • 24 August 2023

  • Minimal participant structure of the event and the emergence of the argument/adjunct distinction
    Zygmunt Frajzyngier , Natalia Gurian Sergei Karpenko | SL 48:1 (2024) pp. 181–227
  • 27 June 2023

  • Argument indexing in Kamang
    Katherine Walker , Pegah Faghiri Eva van Lier | SL 48:2 (2024) pp. 287–350
  • 23 June 2023

  • The psycholinguistic realization of topic in Chinese : Cross-modal priming in the processing of Chinese OSV sentences
    Liulin Zhang | SL 48:2 (2024) pp. 253–286
  • 22 June 2023

  • Person marking in Longxi Qiang
    Wuxi Zheng | SL 48:1 (2024) pp. 228–251
  • 20 March 2023

  • Phasal polarity in Tunisian Arabic
    Jens G. Fischer , Bastian Persohn Veronika Ritt-Benmimoun | SL 48:1 (2024) pp. 121–180
  • 8 March 2023

  • The constructional categorization of Saisiyat multi-predicate sentences
    Chien-pang Wang | SL 48:1 (2024) p. 65
  • 7 February 2023

  • Early Vedic compounds : A typological reappraisal
    Erica Biagetti | SL 48:1 (2024) pp. 1–64
  • 24 January 2023

  • Simulative derivations in crosslinguistic perspective and their diachronic sources
    Guillaume Jacques | SL 47:4 (2023) pp. 957–988
  • 17 January 2023

  • A cross-linguistic syntactic analysis of telicity in motion predicates in Southern Tati, Mandarin, and Ghanaian Student Pidgin
    Pin-Hsi Patrick Chen , Kwaku Owusu Afriyie Osei-Tutu Neda Taherkhani | SL 47:4 (2023) pp. 900–956
  • Variable index placement in Gutob from a typological perspective
    Erika Just Judith Voß | SL 47:4 (2023) pp. 870–899
  • 13 January 2023

  • Grammar (morphosyntax) and discourse
    Tasaku Tsunoda | SL 47:4 (2023) pp. 830–869
  • 20 December 2022

  • Towards robust complexity indices in linguistic typology : A corpus-based assessment
    Yoon Mi Oh François Pellegrino | SL 47:4 (2023) pp. 789–829
  • 19 December 2022

  • From grammaticalization to Diachronic Construction Grammar : A natural evolution of the paradigm
    Spike Gildea Jóhanna Barðdal | SL 47:4 (2023) pp. 743–788
  • 8 December 2022

  • Multiple construction types for nominal expressions in Australian languages : Towards a typology
    Dana Louagie | SL 47:3 (2023) pp. 683–742
  • The history of the polyfunctional 𗗙 jij 1 in Tangut : How did the accusative/genitive syncretism come about?
    Shuya Zhang | SL 47:3 (2023) pp. 643–682
  • 28 November 2022

  • The linguistics of odour in Semaq Beri and Semelai, two Austroasiatic languages of the Malay Peninsula
    Nicole Kruspe Asifa Majid | SL 47:3 (2023) pp. 599–642
  • 21 November 2022

  • A hitherto unnoticed type of verb-framed construction in Lithuanian and the typology of event conflation
    Axel Holvoet | SL 47:3 (2023) pp. 571–598
  • Progressives in present and past
    Ghazaleh Vafaeian | SL 47:3 (2023) pp. 526–570
  • 8 November 2022

  • It’s all about the sentential construction : Lexicalization of complete mono-clausal sentences into words – Evidence from Hebrew
    Israela Becker | SL 47:2 (2023) pp. 463–504
  • 1 November 2022

  • Copula to negator : Grammaticalization of the copula #ni in Tibeto-Burman languages
    Scott DeLancey | SL 47:3 (2023) pp. 505–525
  • IssuesOnline-first articles

    Volume 48 (2024)

    Volume 47 (2023)

    Volume 46 (2022)

    Volume 45 (2021)

    Volume 44 (2020)

    Volume 43 (2019)

    Volume 42 (2018)

    Volume 41 (2017)

    Volume 40 (2016)

    Volume 39 (2015)

    Volume 38 (2014)

    Volume 37 (2013)

    Volume 36 (2012)

    Volume 35 (2011)

    Volume 34 (2010)

    Volume 33 (2009)

    Volume 32 (2008)

    Volume 31 (2007)

    Volume 30 (2006)

    Volume 29 (2005)

    Volume 28 (2004)

    Volume 27 (2003)

    Volume 26 (2002)

    Volume 25 (2001)

    Volume 24 (2000)

    Volume 23 (1999)

    Volume 22 (1998)

    Volume 21 (1997)

    Volume 20 (1996)

    Volume 19 (1995)

    Volume 18 (1994)

    Volume 17 (1993)

    Volume 16 (1992)

    Volume 15 (1991)

    Volume 14 (1990)

    Volume 13 (1989)

    Volume 12 (1988)

    Volume 11 (1987)

    Volume 10 (1986)

    Volume 9 (1985)

    Volume 8 (1984)

    Volume 7 (1983)

    Volume 6 (1982)

    Volume 5 (1981)

    Volume 4 (1980)

    Volume 3 (1979)

    Volume 2 (1978)

    Volume 1 (1977)

    Board
    Consulting Editorial Board
    ORCID logoHilary Chappell | Ecole des hautes études en sciences sociales
    Nicholas Evans | The Australian National University
    ORCID logoBernd Heine | University of Cologne
    ORCID logoNikolaus P. Himmelmann | University of Cologne
    Maria Koptjevskaja-Tamm | Stockholm University
    Ekkehard König | Free University Berlin & Albert Ludwigs University, Freiburg
    ORCID logoEdith A. Moravcsik | University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
    ORCID logoJohanna Nichols | University of California, Berkeley
    ORCID logoLindsay J. Whaley | Dartmouth College
    Editorial Assistant
    Viveka Velupillai | Justus Liebig University Giessen
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    Submission

    Studies in Language offers online submission .

    General

    Studies in Language invites contributions in all areas of linguistics, with special reference for morphology, syntax, semantics, pragmatics, historical linguistics, and discourse. For all contributions, the priority of a typological and cross-linguistic perspective is high: articles on one language only are welcome if of interest to the generalist/universalist. Likewise, interdisciplinary studies are welcome to the extent that they have the same perspective.

    Contributions should be in the English language only. Articles previously published or under consideration by another journal cannot be accepted.

    Submission

    Preferably, manuscripts should be submitted online. Please consult the Short Guide to EM for Authors before you submit your paper. For specifics such as typing format, illustrations and tables, references, glosses etc. please consult the SL style sheet on this website.

    If you are not able to submit online, or for any other editorial correspondence, please contact (one of) the editors:

    Katharina Haude   Nicole Kruspe
    CNRS   Lunds University
    SeDyl / CELIA   Centre for Languages and Literature
    F-94801 VILLEJUIF CEDEX   P.O. Box 201
    France   SE-221 00 LUND

      Sweden
    katharina.haude at cnrs.fr   nicole.kruspe at ling.lu.se

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    John Benjamins journals are committed to maintaining the highest standards of publication ethics and to supporting ethical research practices.

    Authors and reviewers are kindly requested to read this Ethics Statement .

    Please also note the guidance on the use of (generative) AI in the statement.

    Rights and Permissions

    Authors must ensure that they have permission to use any third-party material in their contribution; the permission should include perpetual (not time-limited) world-wide distribution in print and electronic format.

    For information on authors' rights, please consult the rights information page.

    Open Access

    Articles accepted for this journal can be made Open Access through payment of an Article Publication Charge (APC) of EUR 1800 (excl. tax); more information can be found on the publisher's Open Access Policy page. There is no fee if the article is not to be made Open Access and thus available only for subscribers.

    Corresponding authors from institutions with which John Benjamins has a Read & Publish arrangement can publish Open Access without paying a fee; information on the institutions and which articles qualify, can be found on this page.

    For information about permission to post a version of your article online or in an institutional repository ('green' open access or self-archiving), please consult the rights information page.

    Archiving

    John Benjamins Publishing Company has an agreement in place with Portico for the archiving of all its online journals and e-books.

    Subjects

    Main BIC Subject

    CF: Linguistics

    Main BISAC Subject

    LAN009000: LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Linguistics / General